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World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0

World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0

What is WHODAS 2.0

The adult self-administered version of the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 (WHODAS 2.0) is a 36-item measure that assesses disability in adults age 18 years and older. It assesses disability across six domains, including understanding and communicating, getting around, self-care, getting along with people, life activities (i.e., household, work, and/or school activities), and participation in society. Each item on the self-administered version of the WHODAS 2.0 asks the individual to rate how much difficulty he or she has had in specific areas of functioning during the past 30 days.

WHODAS 2.0 Printable PDF

You can create a free account on PsyPack to access fillable PDFs, manuals and educational resources for the WHODAS 2.0

WHODAS 2.0 Scoring and Interpretation

There are two basic options for computing the summary scores for the WHODAS 2.0 short and full versions

  • Simple: the scores assigned to each of the items – “none” (0), “mild” (1) “moderate” (2), “severe” (3) and “extreme” (4) – are summed. This method is referred to as simple scoring because the scores from each of the items are simply added up without recoding or collapsing of response categories; thus, there is no weighting of individual items. This approach is practical to use as a hand-scoring approach, and maybe the method of choice in busy clinical settings or in paper-pencil interview situations. As a result, the simple sum of the scores of the items across all domains constitutes a statistic that is sufficient to describe the degree of functional limitations.
  • Complex: The more complex method of scoring is called “item-response-theory” (IRT) based scoring. It takes into account multiple levels of difficulty for each WHODAS 2.0 item. It takes the coding for each item response as “none”, “mild”, “moderate”, “severe” and “extreme” separately, and then uses an algorithm to determine the summary score by differentially weighting the items and the levels of severity. The SPSS algorithm is available from WHO. The scoring has three steps:

Step 1 – Summing of recoded item scores within each domain.

Step 2 – Summing of all six domain scores.

Step 3 – Converting the summary score into a metric ranging from 0 to 100 (where 0 = no disability; 100 = full disability).

SImple Scoring - The simple sum of the scores of the items across all domains constitutes a statistic that is sufficient to describe the degree of functional limitations.

Complex Scoring - A metric ranging from 0 to 100 (where 0 = no disability; 100 = full disability).

Questions H1–H3 assess the extent to which the various difficulties respondents have encountered have affected their lives.

PsyPack can automatically score the WHODAS 2.0 assessment and prepare corresponding tables and graphs.

WHODAS 2.0 sample result

Further, PsyPack automatically plots a graph to help you easily track progress over time.

WHODAS 2.0 track progress

Sample Report of WHODAS 2.0

Domain

Disability, Functioning

What does WHODAS 2.0 measure

The purpose of the evaluation is to:

  • assess the activity limitations and participation restrictions experienced by an individual, irrespective of medical diagnosis.

Administration

Self-administered

Type of outcome tool

Clinical

Assessment modes

Questionnaire

Age and eligibility

18 years and above

Estimated time

5 to 10 minutes

Notes

Since the questionnaire relies on client self-report, all responses should be verified by the clinician, and a definitive diagnosis is made on clinical grounds taking into account how well the client understood the questionnaire, as well as other relevant information from the client.

To track change in the individual’s level of disability over time, the measure may be completed at regular intervals as clinically indicated, depending on the stability of the individual’s symptoms and treatment status. Consistently high scores on a particular domain may indicate significant and problematic areas for the individual that might warrant further assessment and intervention.

Attribution and References

World Health Organization 2010